Traditional plain yogurt: a therapeutic food for metabolic syndrome?


Baspinar B., Güldaş M.

CRITICAL REVIEWS IN FOOD SCIENCE AND NUTRITION, vol.61, no.18, pp.3129-3143, 2021 (Journal Indexed in SCI) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Review
  • Volume: 61 Issue: 18
  • Publication Date: 2021
  • Doi Number: 10.1080/10408398.2020.1799931
  • Title of Journal : CRITICAL REVIEWS IN FOOD SCIENCE AND NUTRITION
  • Page Numbers: pp.3129-3143
  • Keywords: Bioactive peptides, dairy products, metabolic syndrome, micobiota, type-2 diabetes mellitus, yogurt, CONJUGATED LINOLEIC-ACID, DAIRY PRODUCT CONSUMPTION, NORMAL BLOOD-PRESSURE, CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE, BODY-COMPOSITION, FERMENTED MILK, FATTY-ACIDS, CLA CONTENT, CARDIOMETABOLIC DISEASES, LACTOBACILLUS-HELVETICUS

Abstract

Dairy products have an important role in a healthy diet due to their high-quality protein and rich micronutrients. Yogurt, a fermented milk product, has a similar composition to milk but is a more concentrated product in terms of group B vitamins, minerals, and proteins. It is known that bioactive metabolites and live enzymes that occur by fermentation and digestion, affect the health positively by improving gut microbiota. In recent years, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome, which threatens public health, is increasing rapidly. As with other noninfectious diseases, the diet has an important effect on the prevention and treatment of metabolic syndrome. It has been demonstrated that yogurt has a high-quality amino acid pattern, reduces energy intake by stimulating satiety, and regulates blood glucose level. In addition to the rich protein variety, yogurt also contains peptides that positively affect blood pressure. Unlike milk, increased acidity during the fermentation of yogurt positively affects calcium absorption. Calcium plays an important role in the control of blood glucose and energy metabolism through insulin-dependent and non-insulin-dependent routes. In addition to reducing inflammation, calcium has a positive effect on the regulation of the blood lipid profile by increasing fecal fat excretion. There are many lipid and lipoid nutrients such as saturated fatty acids, phospholipids, sphingolipids, and conjugated linoleic acid that may affect the blood lipid profile in yogurt positively or negatively. There are seen very few randomized controlled studies that are focused on the relationship between yogurt and metabolic syndrome, and these are based on contradictory results. In this review, based on the clinical studies conducted to date, and the nutrient content of yogurt, possible mechanisms of these contradictory results are investigated.