Botanical and geographical origin of Turkish honeys by selected-ion flow-tube mass spectrometry and chemometrics


Özcan Sinir G. , Çopur Ö. U. , Barringer S. A.

JOURNAL OF THE SCIENCE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE, vol.100, no.5, pp.2198-2207, 2020 (Journal Indexed in SCI) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 100 Issue: 5
  • Publication Date: 2020
  • Doi Number: 10.1002/jsfa.10244
  • Title of Journal : JOURNAL OF THE SCIENCE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE
  • Page Numbers: pp.2198-2207
  • Keywords: SIFT-MS, honey aroma, chestnut, heather, wildflower, SOLID-PHASE MICROEXTRACTION, VOLATILE PROFILE, UNIFLORAL HONEY, MARKERS, COMPONENTS, LAVENDER, CHESTNUT, FLAVOR, CITRUS, THYME

Abstract

BACKGROUND Honey has a very important commercial value for producers as a natural product. Honey aroma is formed from the contributions of several volatile compounds, which are influenced by nectar composition, botanical origins, and location. Selected-ion flow-tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS) is a technique that quantifies volatile organic compounds simply and rapidly, even in low concentrations. In this study, the headspace concentration of eight monofloral (chestnut, rhododendron, lavender, sage, carob, heather, citrus, and pine) and three multiflower Turkish honeys were analyzed using SIFT-MS. Soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) was used to differentiate honey samples based on their volatiles. RESULTS This study focused on 78 volatile compounds, which were selected from previous studies of selected honeys. Very clear distinctions were observed between all honeys. Interclass distances greater than 8 indicate that honeys were significantly different. Methanol and ethanol were abundant in the honeys. Chestnut honey collected from the Yalova region had the highest total concentration of volatiles followed by heather honey and chestnut honey collected from the Duzce region. CONCLUSION Honeys with different botanical and geographical origins showed differences in their volatile profile based on chemometric analysis. Of the honey samples, methanol, ethanol, acetoin, ethyl acetate, and isobutanoic acid had the highest discriminating power. Methanol and ethanol, and then acetic acid, were the volatiles with the highest concentrations in most honeys. (c) 2020 The Authors. Journal of The Science of Food and Agriculture published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.