Factors Related to Omalizumab Drug Survival and Treatment Responses in Chronic Urticaria


Hasal E., BÜLBÜL BAŞKAN E., YAZİCİ S., AYDOĞAN K., SARICAOĞLU H.

INTERNATIONAL ARCHIVES OF ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY, 2022 (SCI-Expanded) identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Publication Date: 2022
  • Doi Number: 10.1159/000526148
  • Journal Name: INTERNATIONAL ARCHIVES OF ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Scopus, Academic Search Premier, BIOSIS, CAB Abstracts, EMBASE, Food Science & Technology Abstracts, MEDLINE, Veterinary Science Database
  • Keywords: Chronic urticaria, Omalizumab, Real-life data, Predictors, Patient-reported outcomes, REAL-LIFE EXPERIENCES, HELICOBACTER-PYLORI, CLINICAL-RESPONSE, IGE LEVELS, EFFICACY, THERAPY, EXPRESSION, BIOMARKERS, SAFETY
  • Bursa Uludag University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

Introduction: This study aimed to evaluate factors affecting drug survival and treatment response in patients with chronic urticaria treated with omalizumab in clinical practice. Methods: This study included 386 patients with chronic urticaria. Demographic characteristics, clinical features, laboratory parameters, and omalizumab treatment data were analyzed retrospectively. The 7-day urticaria activity score (UAS7) and urticaria control test (UCT) were used to assess disease severity and treatment responses. Results: Well-controlled disease (UAS7 <= 6) was achieved in 59.3% of patients at a median of 2 months. Complete response was significantly higher in patients treated with omalizumab for >= 12 months (p < 0.001). Family history of asthma (p = 0.01) was less frequent, and disease duration (p = 0.041) was shorter in patients with well-controlled disease. Total treatment duration was longer in patients with relapse (p < 0.001) and serum Helicobacter pylori IgA positivity (p = 0.029). Discussion/Conclusion: Treatment response is better in patients treated with omalizumab for >= 12 months. However, prolonged treatment does not prevent relapse. Our findings suggest that continuous or intermittent therapy is an appropriate alternative treatment option in patients with severe chronic urticaria; however, continuous therapy can be preferred to maintain the patient's quality of life.