Evaluation of extended-season mating disruption of the Oriental fruit moth Grapholita molesta (Busck) (Lep., Tortricidae) in apples


Kovanci O. B. , Walgenbach J., Kennedy G., Borchert D.

JOURNAL OF APPLIED ENTOMOLOGY, vol.128, pp.664-669, 2004 (SCI-Expanded) identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 128
  • Publication Date: 2004
  • Doi Number: 10.1111/j.1439-0418.2004.00906.x
  • Journal Name: JOURNAL OF APPLIED ENTOMOLOGY
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Scopus
  • Page Numbers: pp.664-669
  • Keywords: Grapholita molesta, apple pest management, biorational control, controlled release, mating disruption, LEPIDOPTERA
  • Bursa Uludag University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

Oriental fruit moth Grapholita molesta (Busck) (Lep., Tortricidae) has recently become a key pest of apples throughout the eastern USA. Pheromone-mediated mating disruption of Oriental fruit moth was successfully used in North Carolina apple orchards in the past few years. However, low levels of late-season fruit damage occurred in some orchards treated in late May with hand-applied pheromone dispensers because of inadequate dispenser longevity. To investigate alternative pheromone application schedules for extended mating disruption control, the following pheromone treatments were compared with conventional insecticides in Henderson County (NC) in 2002: late May application of hand-applied dispensers; late June application of hand-applied dispensers; late May application of hand-applied dispensers supplemented with a late August application of sprayable pheromone dispensers; late May application of hand-applied dispensers which have a longer activity period; and conventional insecticides as a control. All treatments were sprayed with an insecticide at petal fall in late April for thinning and for control of the first generation Oriental fruit moth adults. Pheromone trap catches were significantly reduced in all mating disruption blocks compared with conventional insecticide blocks. Among pheromone treatments, the highest trap captures were recorded in the delayed hand-applied dispenser treatment in June before treatment. However, the mean percentage fruit damage did not vary with timing of application of hand-applied dispensers and the type of pheromone dispenser used. Clearly, the combination of each mating disruption treatment with insecticide application against first generation Oriental fruit moth was as effective as the conventional insecticide treatment under moderate population pressure.