Turkish adaptation and validation of the Short-UPPS-P in adolescents and examination of different facets of impulsivity in adolescents with ADHD


ERAY Ş., SIĞIRLI D., YAVUZ B. E. , ŞAHİN V., Liu M., Cyders M. A.

CHILD NEUROPSYCHOLOGY, 2022 (Peer-Reviewed Journal) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Publication Date: 2022
  • Doi Number: 10.1080/09297049.2022.2100338
  • Journal Name: CHILD NEUROPSYCHOLOGY
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded, Scopus, Academic Search Premier, PASCAL, EMBASE, Linguistics & Language Behavior Abstracts, MEDLINE, Psycinfo
  • Keywords: ADHD, S-UPPS-P, impulsivity, adolescents, urgency, PSYCHOMETRIC PROPERTIES, BEHAVIOR SCALE, VERSION, VALIDITY, MODEL, ADULTS, INHIBITION, INVARIANCE, FIT

Abstract

The short form of the Impulsive Behavior scale (S-UPPS-P) is a widely used scale to measure multiple impulsive personality traits; although it has been translated into many languages, no Turkish translation has been studied to date. Our study had two aims. First, we tested the validity and reliability of the Turkish version of the S-UPPS-P for adolescents. Second, we examined impulsive trait characteristics exhibited by adolescents with ADHD, compared to a community sample. We evaluated the psychometric properties of the Turkish S-UPPS-P scale in 384 adolescents aged 11-18 and tested correlations with ADHD symptoms by assessing 41 adolescents diagnosed with ADHD. Our results showed that with a few slight modifications the Turkish translation of the S-UPPS-P scale can validly assess impulsive trait characteristics for Turkish adolescents. The subscales of lack of premeditation, positive urgency, and negative urgency efficiently distinguished between adolescents with ADHD and control subjects. This is the first scale to evaluate the multidimensional nature of impulsivity in Turkish adolescents. This scale is capable of screening various facets of impulsivity in typically developing adolescents as well as those with ADHD, enabling us to enhance our understanding of possible risks for comorbid diseases in the latter group.