Transcriptome-based SNP discovery by GBS and the construction of a genetic map for olive


İPEK A., İPEK M., ERCİŞLİ S., Tangu N. A.

FUNCTIONAL & INTEGRATIVE GENOMICS, vol.17, no.5, pp.493-501, 2017 (Peer-Reviewed Journal) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 17 Issue: 5
  • Publication Date: 2017
  • Doi Number: 10.1007/s10142-017-0552-1
  • Journal Name: FUNCTIONAL & INTEGRATIVE GENOMICS
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded, Scopus
  • Page Numbers: pp.493-501

Abstract

Molecular markers located in the genic regions of plants are valuable tools for the identification of candidate genes of economically important traits and consequent use in marker-assisted selection (MAS). In the past, simple sequence repeat markers (SSRs) and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were developed by sequencing RNA derived from different plant tissues, which involves laborious RNA extraction, mRNA isolation, and cDNA synthesis. In order to develop SNP markers located in olive transcriptomes, we used the recently developed genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) technique. An analysis was done for 125 olive DNA samples (123 DNA samples from a cross-pollinated F-1 mapping population, and two samples from parents). From 45 to 66% of Illumina reads from GBS analysis were aligned to the olive transcriptome. A total of 22,033 transcriptome-based SNP markers were identified, and 3384 of these were mapped in the olive genome. The genetic linkage map constructed in this study consists of 1 cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS), 19 SSR, and 3384 transcriptome-based SNP markers. The map covers 3340.8 cM of the olive genome in 23 linkage groups, with the length of the linkage groups ranging from 55.6 to 248.7 cM. Average map distance between flanking markers was 0.98 cM. This genetic linkage map is a saturated genetic map and will be a useful tool for the localization of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and gene(s) of interest and for the identification of candidate genes for economically important traits.