A novel small molecule antagonist of choline kinase-alpha that simultaneously suppresses MAPK and PI3K/AKT signaling


Clem B. F. , Clem A. L. , YALÇIN A., Goswami U., Arumugam S., Telang S., ...More

ONCOGENE, vol.30, no.30, pp.3370-3380, 2011 (Peer-Reviewed Journal) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 30 Issue: 30
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Doi Number: 10.1038/onc.2011.51
  • Journal Name: ONCOGENE
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded, Scopus
  • Page Numbers: pp.3370-3380
  • Keywords: chemotherapy, choline kinase, metabolism, in silico, phosphocholine, BREAST-CANCER-CELLS, PHOSPHATIDIC-ACID, PHOSPHOLIPASE-D, PROSTATE-CANCER, RAS ACTIVATION, GROWTH-FACTORS, PHOSPHATIDYLCHOLINE, INHIBITORS, RAF-1, P-31

Abstract

Choline kinase-alpha expression and activity are increased in multiple human neoplasms as a result of growth factor stimulation and activation of cancer-related signaling pathways. The product of choline kinase-alpha, phosphocholine, serves as an essential metabolic reservoir for the production of phosphatidylcholine, the major phospholipid constituent of membranes and substrate for the production of lipid second messengers. Using in silico screening for small molecules that may interact with the choline kinase-alpha substrate binding domain, we identified a novel competitive inhibitor, N-(3,5-dimethylphenyl)-2-[[5-(4-ethylphenyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl] sulfanyl] acetamide (termed CK37) that inhibited purified recombinant human choline kinase-alpha activity, reduced the steady-state concentration of phosphocholine in transformed cells, and selectively suppressed the growth of neoplastic cells relative to normal epithelial cells. Choline kinase-alpha activity is required for the downstream production of phosphatidic acid, a promoter of several Ras signaling pathways. CK37 suppressed mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT signaling, disrupted actin cytoskeletal organization, and reduced plasma membrane ruffling. Finally, administration of CK37 significantly decreased tumor growth in a lung tumor xenograft mouse model, suppressed tumor phosphocholine, and diminished activating phosphorylations of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and AKT in vivo. Together, these results further validate choline kinase-alpha as a molecular target for the development of agents that interrupt Ras signaling pathways, and indicate that receptor-based computational screening should facilitate the identification of new classes of choline kinase-alpha inhibitors. Oncogene (2011) 30, 3370-3380; doi:10.1038/onc.2011.51; published online 21 March 2011