Effects of CDP-choline administration on learning and memory in REM sleep-deprived rats


ÇAKIR A., ÖCALAN B., Koc C., SÜYEN G., CANSEV M., KAHVECİ N.

PHYSIOLOGY & BEHAVIOR, vol.213, 2020 (Peer-Reviewed Journal) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 213
  • Publication Date: 2020
  • Doi Number: 10.1016/j.physbeh.2019.112703
  • Journal Name: PHYSIOLOGY & BEHAVIOR
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded, Social Sciences Citation Index, Scopus, Academic Search Premier, PASCAL, Animal Behavior Abstracts, Aquatic Science & Fisheries Abstracts (ASFA), Artic & Antarctic Regions, BIOSIS, CAB Abstracts, Chemical Abstracts Core, EMBASE, Food Science & Technology Abstracts, MEDLINE, Psycinfo, Veterinary Science Database
  • Keywords: REM sleep deprivation, CDP-choline, Morris water maze, Learning and memory, Camkll, total antioxidant Capacity, LONG-TERM POTENTIATION, DEPENDENT PROTEIN-KINASE, BIDIRECTIONAL SYNAPTIC PLASTICITY, HIPPOCAMPAL OXIDATIVE STRESS, FLOWER POT TECHNIQUE, PARADOXICAL SLEEP, SUPEROXIDE-DISMUTASE, COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT, DEPRIVATION IMPAIRS, CITICOLINE PROTECTS

Abstract

Cytidine 5-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) administration has been shown to improve learning and memory deficits in different models of brain disorders. In this study, effects of CDP-choline on the well known negative effects of Rapid Eye Movements (REM) sleep deprivation on learning and memory were investigated. Sleep deprivation was induced by placing adult male Wistar albino rats on 6.5 cm diameter platforms individually for 96 h according to flower pot method. Learning and memory performances were evaluated using Morris Water Maze (MWM) test during the same period of time. Saline or CDP-choline (100 mu mol/kg, 300 mu mol/kg or 600 mu mol/kg) was administered intraperitoneally 30 min prior to the onset of MWM experiments. On completion of behavioral tests, rats were decapitated and hippocampi were assayed for total and phosphorylated Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (tCaMKII and pCaMKII, respectively) and total antioxidant capacity. We observed that while REM sleep deprivation had no effect on learning, it diminished the memory function, which was associated with decreased levels of pCaMKII and total antioxidant capacity in the hippocampus. CDP-choline treatment blocked the impairment in memory function of sleep-deprived rats and, increased pCaMKII levels and total antioxidant capacity. These data suggest that CDP-choline reduces REM sleep deprivation-induced impairment in memory, at least in part, by counteracting the disturbances in biochemical and molecular biological parameters.