Green consumerism: the influence of antioxidant parameters and socio-economic values on Tarhana consumption patterns


Creative Commons License

Gürbüz İ. B. , Yildiz E.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLLUTION RESEARCH, vol.26, pp.25526-25537, 2019 (SCI-Expanded) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 26
  • Publication Date: 2019
  • Doi Number: 10.1007/s11356-019-05807-6
  • Journal Name: ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLLUTION RESEARCH
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Scopus
  • Page Numbers: pp.25526-25537
  • Keywords: Tarhana, Green food, Traditional nutrition, Consumption patterns, Phenolic content, Antioxidant capacity, FUNCTIONAL-PROPERTIES, FOOD-CONSUMPTION, ORGANIC FOOD, PRODUCT ATTRIBUTES, PURCHASE BEHAVIOR, HEALTH-BENEFITS, INTENTION, BIOAVAILABILITY, POLYPHENOLS, BIOACCESSIBILITY
  • Bursa Uludag University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

This study aimed to examine the production and consumption patterns of the tarhana as a green food product and its content in terms of health value in the socio-economic framework by comparing urban and rural households. To be able to assess the tarhana's health value, the addition of antioxidative parameters was analysed. We obtained the data as a result of a two-part study. The first part of the research included a structured survey conducted between September and December 2015. In the second part, three types of tarhana samples evaluated in terms of their antioxidant capacity and total phenolic content as extractable, hydrolysable, and bioaccessible phenolics to support the claim that homemade tarhana offers higher nutritional potential and healthier content than commercially produced tarhana. Organic and additive-free homemade tarhana samples have great antioxidative potential, also depending on the content and the production pattern. The results of the antioxidant capacity, total phenolic content analyses, and their bioaccessibility revealed that non-fermented homemade tarhana and cranberry-added tarhana stand out, according to production process and content. Our findings showed that participants mostly produced the tarhana at home. In cases where they could not produce it themselves, they supplied it from their family and friends. This result showed us that participants preferred homemade tarhana over industrial tarhana sold in markets. Rural areas mostly consumed tarhana for its economic value. However, tarhana consumption did not decrease in cities. Only the consumption mode and the times have changed.