Accelerated idioventricular rhythm resulting in torsades de pointes and cardiac arrest in a child: successfully cryoablated in left'coronary cusp


Ergul Y., Kafali H. C. , Uysal F.

CARDIOLOGY IN THE YOUNG, vol.30, no.3, 2020 (Journal Indexed in SCI) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 30 Issue: 3
  • Publication Date: 2020
  • Doi Number: 10.1017/s1047951119002993
  • Title of Journal : CARDIOLOGY IN THE YOUNG

Abstract

Known as a benign arrhythmia and normally requiring no specific treatment, accelerated idioventricular rhythm can rarely degenerate to a life-threatening arrhythmia. Here, we present a child with left coronary cusp-originating accelerated idioventricular rhythm, degenerating into torsades de pointes and resulting in cardiac arrest, which was ablated with a cryocatheter. An 11-year-old boy, followed due to asymptomatic accelerated idioventricular rhythm before, was referred to our department because he had experienced an aborted cardiac arrest during sleep. He had been resuscitated for 5 minutes. Twenty-four-hour Holter-ECG revealed incessant accelerated idioventricular rhythm, consisting up to 90% of the whole record and two torsades de pointes attacks, triggered by accelerated idioventricular rhythm-induced "R on T" phenomenon, and resulting in syncope and cardiac arrest. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed no structural cardiac defect but mild left ventricular systolic dysfunction with an ejection fraction of 45% and shortening fraction 23%. An electrophysiologic study was conducted, and accelerated idioventricular rhythm focus was mapped to left aortic coronary cusp. A cryocatheter with an 8-mm tip was preferred for successful ablation of the accelerated idioventricular rhythm focus, due to close neighbourhood to coronary ostium. The patient was discharged in 3 days without any premature ventricular contractions or accelerated idioventricular rhythm and with normalised cardiac functions. After 9 months on follow-up, he was still asymptomatic, without any premature ventricular contractions or accelerated idioventricular rhythm and with normal cardiac functions. Although the clinical course of accelerated idioventricular rhythm is known as benign, accelerated idioventricular rhythm can rarely degenerate to a life-threatening arrhythmia. In such cases, electrophysiologic study and catheter ablation are a good option in such cases with accelerated idioventricular rhythm for an ultimate cure.