Is there a relationship between plantar foot sensation and static balance, physical performance, fear of falling, and quality of life in hemodialysis patients?


Erdoganoglu Y., Yalcin B., Kulah E., Kaya D.

HEMODIALYSIS INTERNATIONAL, vol.23, no.2, pp.273-278, 2019 (Peer-Reviewed Journal) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 23 Issue: 2
  • Publication Date: 2019
  • Doi Number: 10.1111/hdi.12724
  • Journal Name: HEMODIALYSIS INTERNATIONAL
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded, Scopus
  • Page Numbers: pp.273-278
  • Keywords: Foot base pressure, hemodialysis, physical, physical performance, balance, RISK

Abstract

Introduction: This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between plantar foot sensation and static balance, physical performance, fear of falling, and quality of life in hemodialysis patients. Materials and Methods: The study involved 24 hemodialysis patients and 20 healthy volunteers. Light touch-pressure sensation (Semmes Weinstein Monofilament test kit), two-point discrimination sensation (esthesiometer) and vibration sensation (128 Hz diapason) were used to evaluate plantar foot sensation. Static balance was assessed by the one-leg standing balance test, physical performance by the Timed Up and Go test, fear of falling with the Fall Efficacy Scale, and quality of life with the Ferrans and Powers Quality of Life Index Dialysis Version. Findings: There was a significant difference in plantar foot sensation, static balance, and physical performance of the patients compared to the healthy controls (P < 0.05). There was a strong correlation between static balance and physical performance with foot sensation in the hemodialysis patients (P < 0.05). There was also a strong correlation between static balance, physical performance, and fear of falling in hemodialysis patients (P < 0.05). The correlation between static balance, physical performance, and quality of life in the hemodialysis patients was strong (P < 0.05). Discussion: The most important result of this study is that light touch-pressure sensation, vibration sensation, two-point discrimination sensation, static balance, and physical performance, all of which involve the activity of cutaneous sensory receptors on the sole of the foot, are reduced in individuals who undergo hemodialysis. The findings of this study suggest potential rehabilitation strategies that could be applied to this patient group.