Effect of high-fat diet on the various morphological parameters of the ovary


Hilal G., Fatma T., Ferruh Y., Sabire G. , Yuksel A.

ANATOMY & CELL BIOLOGY, vol.53, no.1, pp.58-67, 2020 (Journal Indexed in ESCI) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 53 Issue: 1
  • Publication Date: 2020
  • Doi Number: 10.5115/acb.19.082
  • Title of Journal : ANATOMY & CELL BIOLOGY
  • Page Numbers: pp.58-67
  • Keywords: High-fat diet, Morphology, Obesity, Ovary, Stereology, IN-VITRO FERTILIZATION, INDUCED OBESITY, OVERWEIGHT, FERTILITY, GROWTH, INFERTILITY, PREVALENCE, RECEPTOR, OUTCOMES, GIRLS

Abstract

Increased food consumption rich in fat and carbohydrate and sedentary lifestyle have seriously increased the rates of obesity and obesity-associated diseases in developed countries. Female mice with diet-induced obesity exhibit infertility and thus can serve as a model for human polycystic ovary syndrome. The aim of the present study was to examine how ovary is affected by diet-induced obesity. The effects of high-fat diet (HFD) on ovary morphology in mice fed with HFD were investigated using unbiased stereological methods. The ovary of mice fed with HFD (n=8, C1090-60, Altromine) for 9 weeks, were compared with that of mice fed with standard chow diet (n=8, C1090-10, Altromine). Stereological parameters were obtained in diestrus cycle. The samples were processed through routine and standard paraffin embedding and were serially sectioned in 5-mu m thickness then, every 10th section was saved, stained with Crossman's triple stain for counting and measuring. In all sampled sections mean follicle numbers, diameters, total ovarian volume cortex to medulla ratio (Vv), ovum to cell ratio in secondary follicle were examined in all sampled sections. The present results showed that weight of ovarian and amount of intraperitoneal adipose tissue and the body weight markedly increased in obese mice when compared with control groups. Moreover, follicle numbers (except primordial follicles) and diameters were significantly increased in obese mice. Cortex to medulla ratio (Vv) and ovum to cell ratio in secondary follicle were also considerably different between experimental and the control groups. The present findings indicate that obesity adversely affects overall ovarian morphology.