Growth performance, pH value of gizzard, hepatic enzyme activity, immunologic indicators, intestinal histomorphology, and cecal microflora of broilers fed diets supplemented with processed lignocellulose


SÖZCÜ A.

POULTRY SCIENCE, vol.98, no.12, pp.6880-6887, 2019 (Journal Indexed in SCI) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 98 Issue: 12
  • Publication Date: 2019
  • Doi Number: 10.3382/ps/pez449
  • Title of Journal : POULTRY SCIENCE
  • Page Numbers: pp.6880-6887

Abstract

This study was performed to investigate the hypothesis that supplementation of processed lignocellulose (PL) in the diets of broilers has a positive effect on growing performance, pH value of gizzard, hepatic enzyme activity, immunologic indicators, histomorphological character of small intestine, and cecal microflora populations. A total of 720 one-day-old Ross 308 broiler chicks were allotted to 4 treatment groups and fed maize-soybean meal based diets. The basal diet was supplemented with PL with an amount of 0 kg (control), 0.5 kg, 1 kg, and 2 kg per ton feed. Growing performance parameters, were determined weekly until 35 D of age. Blood samples for enzyme activities and immunoglobulins, jejunum and cecum samples for histomorphological characters for villus growth, and microbial population were collected from 12 broilers from each group. At 35 D of age, body weight of broilers supplemented with 1 kg of PL was found to be the highest with a value of 2305.0 g, when compared to the broilers supplemented with control, 0,5 and 2 kg of PL groups (2154.0, 2201.0, and 2141.7 g, respectively, P = 0.001). An increased activity of aspartate amino transferase (AST) was observed in the control and 1 kg PL supplementation groups (633.6 and 597.4 IU/L, respectively), whereas alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was the highest in the control group (5404 IU/L, P < 0.05). Broilers in the control group had the lowest level of IgY and IgA (122.2 and 25.8 mg/dL, respectively, P < 0.05). Villus height increased by 22.0%, 40.7%, and 34.8% in 0.5, 1, and 2 kg PL supplementation groups, respectively, when compared to the control (P < 0.001). The processed lignocellulose supplemented as 1 kg of PL decreased the average count of Staphylococcaceae, E. coli, and Enterobacteriaceae, whereas it increased the population of Lactobacillus spp. in the cecum (P < 0.05). These data indicate that the supplementation of processed lignocellulose had positive effects for performance via changes in hepatic enzyme activities, immunoglobulin levels, villus growth in jejunum, and microflora in cecum.